Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

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SCiO, the Pocket Molecular Sensor

April 30, 2014

A small consumer-level molecular scanner lets you analyze the objects around you for relevant information, from food calories or quality, medicine, nature, etc.

When you get your SCiO, you’ll be able to:

Get nutritional facts about different kinds of food: salad dressings, sauces, fruits, cheeses, and much more.
See how ripe an Avocado is, through the peel!
Find out the quality of your cooking oil.
Know the well being of your plants.
Analyze soil or hydroponic solutions.
Authenticate medications or supplements.
Upload and tag the spectrum of any material on Earth to our database. Even yourself.

The Kickstarter was launched a few day ago and made it’s $200,000 goal within 24 hours – the potential for this tech is huge. Watch the video embedded below to see the potential:

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The Feynman Lectures on Physics AVAILABLE

September 14, 2013

Nearly fifty years have passed since Richard Feynman taught the introductory physics course at Caltech that gave rise to these three volumes, The Feynman Lectures on Physics. In those fifty years our understanding of the physical world has changed greatly, but The Feynman Lectures on Physics has endured. Feynman’s lectures are as powerful today as when first published, thanks to Feynman’s unique physics insights and pedagogy. They have been studied worldwide by novices and mature physicists alike; they have been translated into at least a dozen languages with more than 1.5 millions copies printed in the English language alone. Perhaps no other set of physics books has had such wide impact, for so long.

Click HERE

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Graphic: Sarin Chemical Warfare Nerve Agent

September 9, 2013

Sarin, allegedly used by the Syrian regime to kill more than 1,400 people on Aug. 21, is one of the most toxic and rapidly acting nerve agents. Developed in 1938 by Germany as a pesticide, sarin is, in its pure form, a clear, colourless, tasteless liquid that has no odour. Even at low concentrations, sarin can be fatal within one minute and those who survive will have permanent neurological damage.

Text and Image via National Post

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MEDICAL SIMULATION by Jim Johnston

April 23, 2013

Medical Simulation is Jim Johnston’s recent work shot at The Bristol Medical Simulation Centre, a training facility in West England. This center provides medical students and clinicians the opportunity to rehearse and perfect procedures on Human Patient Simulators (HPS’s)—fullscale and fully interactive human body simulators—in efforts to improve competency and reduce the 1-5% of accidental deaths that occur in hospitals due to human error.

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What Our Brains Can Teach Us

February 24, 2013

So it goes with the brain. We are the aliens in that landscape, and the brain is an even more complicated cipher. It is composed of 100 billion electrically active cells called neurons, each connected to many thousands of its neighbors. Each neuron relays information in the form of miniature voltage spikes, which are then converted into chemical signals that bridge the gap to other neurons. Most neurons send these signals many times per second; if each signaling event were to make a sound as loud as a pin dropping, the cacophony from a single human head would blow out all the windows. The complexity of such a system bankrupts our language; observing the brain with our current technologies, we mostly detect an enigmatic uproar.

Looking at the brain from a distance isn’t much use, nor is zooming in to a single neuron. A new kind of science is required, one that can track and analyze the activity of billions of neurons simultaneously.

Excerpt from an article written by DAVID EAGLEMAN, NYT. Continue HERE

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Sound Made Visible: Piano notes made visible on the CymaScope

February 24, 2013

For the first time in history individual piano notes have been made visible using the CymaScope instrument. The piano notes were painstakingly recorded by Evy King and then fed into the CymaScope one by one and the results recorded in high definition video. Click HERE to see sound.

Shannon Novak, a New Zealand-born fine artist, commissioned us to image 12 piano notes as inspiration for a series of 12 musical canvases. We decided to image the notes in video mode because when we observed the ‘A1′ note we discovered, surprisingly, that the energy envelope changes over time as the string’s harmonics mix in the piano’s wooden bridge. Instead of the envelope being fairly stable, as we had imagined, the harmonics actually cause the CymaGlyphs to be wonderfully dynamic. Our ears can easily detect the changes in the harmonics and the CymaScope now reveals them–probably a first in acoustic physics.

Capturing the dynamics was only possible with HD video but taming the dynamics of the piano’s first strike, followed by the short plateau and long decay phase, was tricky. We achieved the result with the help of a professional audio compressor operating in real time.

The Cymascope is an instrument that makes sound or music visible, creating detailed 3D impressions of sound or music vibrations. Here the rapidly expanding sphere is captured in a frozen moment. The interior reveals a beautiful and complex structure representing the rich harmonic nature of violin music.

All text and images via Cymascope

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Open Library of Humanities

February 16, 2013

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH): a project exploring a PLOS-style model for the humanities and social sciences. This site aims to give the background to and rationale for such a project along with an initial call for participants so that we can put a team together in Spring 2013. As their preliminary statement: we are not affiliated in any way with PLOS. This website will be used for the preliminary stages of developing the organizational structure of OLH, as we launch as a not-for-profit company, and in the run-up to launching the actual journal and database.